Prisoner Voting Restrictions

If elected in 2018 a Marshall Liberal Government will prevent prisoners voting in State Elections if they are convicted of a crime so serious that they are sentenced to a term of three or more years.

Effective Penalties For Serious Crimes

We need to ensure penalties imposed by the courts deter potential criminals and adequately punish those who do commit crimes.

If their offending is serious enough to warrant a significant prison term, they become a burden on society.

Their crimes have victims while all law-abiding citizens must meet the substantial cost of keeping them in prison.

By maintaining a consistent and principled approach to justice, we will ensure that our system carries the confidence of the community and actively contributes to community safety. The penalty must fit the crime.

In many countries, convicted criminals serving a significant term of imprisonment are denied the vote.

This restriction was applied in the United Kingdom as long ago as 1870.

In Australia, no person sentenced to three or more years’ imprisonment can vote at a Federal election.

South Australia is the only state which does not impose restrictions upon prisoners voting.

It is time South Australia caught up with all the other states.

The State Liberals Plan

If elected in 2018 a Marshall Liberal Government will prevent prisoners voting in State Elections if they are convicted of a crime so serious that they are sentenced to a term of three or more years.

The denial of the right to vote will apply for the duration of their sentences.

Rehabilitation is an important aspect of imprisonment.

But deterrence is equally important through the denial of a range of freedoms.

Prisoners are denied their liberty and their freedom of association. The Liberals believe for the time they are imprisoned for serious crimes they should also lose their right to vote.

People who have shown no respect for the law by breaking it in a way which requires the courts to impose a significant term of imprisonment have broken their contract with society to be lawabiding and should lose the right to have a say in how they are governed.

If you are guilty of a serious breach of the law, you cannot also vote to make the law.

Part of our plan for SA