Speed Camera Audit

If elected in March 2018, a Marshall Liberal Government will conduct an audit of traffic cameras to make sure they are operating for safety purposes and not to raise revenue.

The Problem

The Royal Automobile Association (RAA) has repeatedly highlighted individual instances where speed camera use is questionable and is not achieving the road safety outcomes desired.

The community is increasingly cynical about speed camera placement and frequency and this perception needs to be changed so that we can further improve driver behaviour.

The government continues to increase the use of speed cameras and in the 2017/18 budget the government announced a further 10 fixed speed cameras. At the same time the value of the Community Road Safety fund has remained stagnant at $81m.

Since 2007/08 speeding fines have increased by over 100%, increasing total annual revenue from fines and penalties to over $141m.

A lot of that has been generated by mobile speed cameras, from which revenue has increased at an even faster rate.

We do not dispute the use of cameras to deter speeding and encourage safer use of our roads.

But South Australians need assurance that speed cameras aren’t being used as a cash cow for the government and are solely dedicated to locations where their use will reduce the number of accidents on our roads.

We have repeatedly asked the Weatherill Government to initiate an audit of the use of speed cameras but it has refused to do so.

The State Liberals' Plan

If elected in March 2018, a Marshall Liberal Government will conduct an audit of traffic cameras to make sure they are operating for safety purposes and not to raise revenue.

The audit will consider two questions:

  1. Have speed cameras been located in areas identified as having the greatest road safety risk?
  2. Have speed cameras reduced speeding and the number and severity of road crashes in the locations in which they have been placed?

The outcomes of the audit will be disclosed publicly.

Part of our plan for SA