Rec fishers to hook up more under Marshall plan

If elected in March a Marshall Liberal Government will spend $1.2 million building three new artificial reefs along Adelaide’s metropolitan coastline to create more opportunities for South Australia’s 277,000 recreational fishers.

This latest announcement follows the State Liberals’ previous commitments to grow the recreational fishing sector including, opening reservoirs for recreational fishing, reviewing South Australia’s marine parks and reforming the Marine Scale Fishery to enable recreational fishers to catch more whiting, snapper and southern calamari.

“Our state has over 5,000 kilometres of coastline and for many South Australians fishing is very much a part of their way of life,” said State Liberal Leader Steven Marshall.

“There are 277,000 recreational fishers in South Australia who enjoy fishing from boats, jetties or even off our beaches with family and friends.

“There are about 60,000 registered boats in South Australia, the majority of which are in metropolitan Adelaide and would be a very short drive from local boat ramps to access these reefs.

“That’s why we will create three new artificial reefs off our metropolitan coast, so they’re easily accessible for the majority of our recreational fishers.

“We will also ensure that these artificial reefs are made locally right here in South Australia.

“Artificial reefs have been a huge success in other jurisdictions and South Australian anglers and their families should have the same opportunities as those in other states.

“These new reefs will help grow our recreational fishing sector which will benefit local businesses like our tackle and bait shops which is great news for our economy and jobs in South Australia.

“Artificial reefs could also open up a host of tourism opportunities, enabling fishing charter operators to capitalise on South Australia’s unique and diverse marine environment.

“South Australia’s recreational fishing sector has been hurt by the Weatherill Government’s marine parks which are stifling recreational fishing opportunities.